TRENDSPOTTER: Take Notes from the Stem Cell Controversy: Stand Up and Be Heard! | GenomeWeb

THIS IS not a column about whether the National Institutes of Health should continue to fund stem cell research. Having said that, my own view is that stem cells are neither less nor more important as tools for curing or treating diseases than other technologies. More to the point, genomics offers many more ways to detect and prevent disease than does stem cell technology (and indeed, without genomics, the mutations and glitches all manner of stem cells encounter en route to becoming differentiated may never be overcome).

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