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Takeda, Sage Bionetworks Partner to Find Drug Targets for CNS

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) –Takeda Pharmaceutical and Sage Bionetworks announced on Thursday a collaboration to identify drug targets for central nervous system diseases.

Under the agreement, Takeda, based in Osaka, Japan, will pay Sage $3.6 million in research funding and fees. Sage will develop a predictive model and identify key regulatory genes and predictive biomarkers in patients with CNS diseases.

The partners will then discover and prioritize the targets "that hold the greatest potential for molecular intervention," they said in a statement.

Further terms were not disclosed.

"We view this collaboration as an opportunity to further Takeda's goal of identifying targets for new therapeutics to treat the serious effects of CNS diseases where there is a high unmet need for patients all over the world," said Paul Chapman, general manager and head of the Pharmaceutical Research Division for Takeda.

Sage is a non-profit medical research organization based in Seattle that uses molecular and clinical datasets for improved therapeutic development.

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