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Structural Genomix and Hereditary Disease Foundation Explore Huntington s Disease Protein

NEW YORK, Dec. 10-The San Diego company Structural GenomiX is starting a research collaboration with the Hereditary Disease Foundation to solve the structure of huntingtin, the protein associated with Huntington's Disease.

 

Structural GenomiX will use its structure determination methods, including protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography, to find out how 3-D modifications in the protein structure are involved in disease initiation and progression. The partners will also study the structure of the normal protein in order to understand its normal function.

 

Structural GenomiX will receive research funding, royalties, and payments at milestones.

 

HDF will attempt to identify drug candidates that interact with this protein as potential therapeutics for Huntington's Disease.

 

Huntington's Disease, caused by a mutation on the fourth chromosome, is a degenerative neurological disorder that causes severe cognitive problems and motor problems. Roughly 35,000 to 50,000 Americans have the disease, which is generally fatal.

 

The Hereditary Disease Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting biomedical research into genetic diseases.

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