As fast-paced as HIV research is, HIV is an even faster-moving virus. Recently, new genomics-based technologies are turning up in the HIV/AIDS field. Ultra-deep pyro-
sequencing may replace the Sanger method as the standard way to detect low-level, and often drug-resistant, strains of HIV that a person might have. Also, genome-wide association studies are highlighting why people react differently to early HIV infection. The goal of both these new approaches is the same as a lot of research in HIV and AIDS: new and better therapeutics.

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A company hopes to capture the genetic diversity in India to power tailored therapeutics, BBC News reports.

Researchers tie variants in seven genes to insomnia risk, Live Science reports.

The US Environmental Protection Agency has approved an RNAi-based insecticide, according to the Atlantic.

In PLOS this week: locus near OAS1 linked to Sjogren's syndrome, rotavirus reassortment events uncovered by sequencing, and more.