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In Silico: Jan 1, 2003

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www.GenomeWeb.com Daily

 

Gridlock to Grants

 

A little gridlock can go a long way. The months of political wrangling that created the new US Department of Homeland Security have probably been a good thing, at least from the perspective of the biomedical research community.

 

Find “New Homeland Security Law Brings Scientific Sigh of Relief” by searching: homeland

 

What Was That About a Gift Horse?

 

“I wouldn’t take it if they gave it to me.”

— Craig Venter, referring to Celera’s aging supercomputer

 

Find “Venter to Bio World: Exa-Byte Me” by searching: firepower

 

At Least It Wasn’t ‘Ology’

 

The march of science may be set to the rhythm of language — or at least the sound of whatever comes before “omics.” “How do you define success in science?” asked Jeremy Nicholson at the Imperial College of the University of London. “When I coin my own ‘ome’ word.”

 

Find “Seeking the Universal Ome” by searching: universal

 

www.BioArraynews.com Weekly

Starter Kit

 

TeleChem/Arrayit has aligned a cartel of companies in an effort to expand a nascent market by giving away a bundle of everything necessary to conduct a microarray experiment. The package includes scanning and image quantification services provided by PerkinElmer and 60 days of GeneTraffic analysis from Iobion.

 

Find “Giving Away Your Microarray Experiments? Industry Group Hopes It’s Priceless Marketing” by searching: priceless

 

www.Bioinform.com Weekly

Try, Try Again

 

League of Their Own

 

“I don’t think we’ve learned how to handle the vendor community properly. We should treat vendor offerings the same as any other in-house project — evaluate benefit, cost, risk, upside, downside — but we don’t actually do that.”

— David Pioli, director of lead discovery informatics at Aventis

 

Find “Pharma Demands Return on Investment from IT, So How Do You Win Them Over?” by searching: Pioli

 

www.ProteoMonitor.com Weekly

Hall of Mirrors (and Proteins)

 

When HUPO held court at Versailles, about 880 participants from 34 countries heeded its call to the First World Congress. The program comprised both scientific talks and policy discussions ranging from HUPO initiatives to human proteome efforts around the world, and collaborations between industry and academia.

 

Find “HUPO Versailles Meeting Showcases the World’s Latest Proteomics Projects” by searching: Versailles