Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Signed, Sealed, and Delivered

Premium

While cancer treatments based on RNA interference are seen by some cancer researcher as the new frontier in cancer therapy, researchers have struggled to find an efficient delivery method for the drugs that also keeps the siRNA safe from being broken down before it reaches its target. Now, researchers at MIT may have solved the problem, according to a university press release. In a letter published recently in Nature Materials, the team describes its novel delivery system in which RNA is packed into "microspheres so dense that they withstand degradation until they reach their destinations," the blog says. "The new system … knocks down expression of specific genes as effectively as existing delivery methods, but with a much smaller dose of particles."

The Scan

For Better Odds

Bloomberg reports that a child has been born following polygenic risk score screening as an embryo.

Booster Decision Expected

The New York Times reports the US Food and Drug Administration is expected to authorize a booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech SARS-CoV-2 vaccine this week for individuals over 65 or at high risk.

Snipping HIV Out

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports Temple University researchers are to test a gene-editing approach for treating HIV.

PLOS Papers on Cancer Risk Scores, Typhoid Fever in Colombia, Streptococcus Protection

In PLOS this week: application of cancer polygenic risk scores across ancestries, genetic diversity of typhoid fever-causing Salmonella, and more.