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SickKids' Center for Applied Genomics Gains Share of $846K Grant

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The Center for Applied Genomics at the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto has received part of a CAD$870,000 ($846,000) grant from the non-profit Wellcome Trust to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic tools for childhood diseases, according to the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation. 
 
Sharing the grant with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory’s European Bioinformatics Institute, SickKids specifically plans to use the funds to expand its work on the Database of Genomic Variants — also called the Toronto Database — which houses structural and copy number variation data. 
 
The MRI said today that the researchers at SickKids will collect, organize, and curate genome-wide information for use in developing new prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic tools for children’s health.
 
“The biological importance of copy number variability is clear, only three years following its discovery,” Alan Schafer, head of molecular and physiological sciences at the Wellcome Trust, said in a statement. “With the technology now available to discover CNV regions at an unprecedented resolution, CNV research will be greatly facilitated by this database.”

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.