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From the Shoulders of a Giant

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Looks like Shimadzu wants to join in the proteomics games. The company just spun out Shimadzu Biotech, headquartered in Kyoto, Japan, and led by its former head of life sciences, Tetsuo Ichikawa. The spinoff is “not a single corporation but a strategic global unit,” Ichikawa says; it will draw on the parent company’s subsidiaries in the US, Europe, and Australia. Shimadzu Biotech inherits a $43 million business in bioscience and expects that to grow to more than $170 million within three years.

According to Ichikawa, Shimadzu Biotech will focus on proteomics and DNA analysis. He predicts most of its sales will be from instruments and the remaining quarter from services and reagents, though the goal is to get services and reagents to comprise three-fourths of the company’s sales. Already, Shimadzu’s mass spec technology (the TOFMAS/AXIMA) has been the basis for partnerships with Sigma-Aldrich, Proteome Systems, and LumiCyte. Not bad for a newbie.

— Meredith Salisbury

 

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