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Short Reads: May 1, 2001 (rev. 1)

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Hyseq CEO George Rathmann stepped down. Newly hired president and COO Ted Love will replace him. Ironic twist: upon his hire, Love told GT he went to Hyseq largely for “the chance to work side by side with George Rathmann.” The former CEO will remain chairman of the board.

 

Niv Caviar, formerly with Affymetrix, joined Immusol as vice president of business development. Caviar seems to prefer variety on his plate — he’s a mechanical engineer with an MBA who became an Air Force captain and worked at Andersen Consulting.

 

Genomics and proteomics company GPC Biotech broadened its drug development and clinical development capacities with the hire of Benno Rattel, formerly with Klinge Pharma, as senior director of drug development. GPC also established a clinical development advisory panel with consultants Jerome Birnbaum, Stephen Carter, and Prasad Sunkara.

 

Larry Kier took 23 years of toxicology experience with Monsanto/Pharmacia and went back to square one. Phase one, anyway: Phase-1 Molecular Toxicology, which uses transcriptome profiling and other genomics and proteomics technologies. Kier is director of preclinical research.

 

Bioinformaticist Eric Neumann left Cambridge, Mass., consulting firm 3rd Millennium over “differences in company direction.” He will freelance for now.

 

A new dawn: John Mendlein left his senior executive position at Aurora Biosciences and joined Integrative Proteomics as chairman and CEO.

 

IP concerns burned bright at TIGR — enough that Michael Brown was shifted from a three-year stint as staff counsel to intellectual property counsel and technology transfer manager.

 

EraGen Biosciences announced the arrival of COO Gary Alianell, former CEO and president of NucleoTech, and the departure of Gideon Shapiro, president and CEO for the past 18 months.

 

Bristol-Myers Squibb promoted Elliott Sigal to senior vice president for drug discovery and exploratory development. Sigal will lead research efforts at BMS’s Pharmaceutical Research Institute.

 

Ready for a fun game? Find the person whose genome matches yours! Kristina Johnson, dean of engineering at Duke University, is doing a statistical study to determine the chances that any two people in a population have the same DNA sequence. We’d call it crazy, but then again, you only need 23 people in a room to have higher than 50 percent odds that two will share a birthday.

The Scan

US Supports Patent Waivers

NPR reports that the Biden Administration has announced its support for waiving intellectual property protections for SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.

Vaccines Versus Variants

Two studies find the Pfizer-BioNTech SARS-CoV-2 vaccine to be effective against viral variants, and Moderna reports on booster shots to combat variants.

CRISPR for What Ails You

The Wall Street Journal writes that CRISPR-based therapies could someday be used to treat common conditions like heart attacks.

Nature Papers Review Integration of Single-Cell Assay Data, Present Approach to Detect Rare Variants

In Nature this week: review of ways to integrate data from single-cell assays, and more.