If 2007 was the year of the next-gen sequencer, 2008 could turn out to be the year when bioinformaticists are forced to learn how to analyze and annotate all the data those machines are spitting out. And this will likely drive further trends in the field, such as increased hiring and a renewed focus on economical computing systems.

Ryan Koehler, staff scientist with Applied Biosystems, says that “the biggest thing” in bioinformatics in the coming year “will be the giant data sets … [from] next-gen sequencing [machines].”

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