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Rigel Licenses Cyclic Peptide Library and Novel Protein from Two Research Groups

NEW YORK, Feb. 21 - Functional-genomics firm Rigel Pharmaceuticals has made two new licensing deals with academic researchers at Pennsylvania State University and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, the company said on Thursday.

 

From Penn State, Rigel has in-licensed Siclopps, the cyclic peptide technology. The company is developing its own intracellular cyclic peptide library, which it plans to integrate with its functional-genomics system as a source of potential new therapeutics.

 

From the Oklahoma foundation, the company in-licensed the patent to the RBX protein. Also known as ROC1, this protein is a ubiquitin ligase with potential therapeutic relevance to both oncology and inflammatory disease, two areas in which Rigel is interested. The company has already begun high-throughput screening with this target.

 

The Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation is a private non-profit biomedical research center based in Oklahoma City.

 

Rigel Pharmaceuticals, of South San Francisco, Calif., hopes to begin clinical trials this year on one or more new drugs for inflammatory disease, cancer, or hepatitis C.

 

In early September, the company launched a two-year structural-proteomics collaboration with MediChem focused on ubiquitin ligases.

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