Even as it was providing scientists with a slew of data, the human genome was giving Matt Ridley fodder for his nonfiction book, Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters. Released in October of last year, Genome climbed the New York Times bestseller list and was a finalist for this year’s L.A. Times book prize. Ridley, a former editor with The Economist, lives in England with his wife and two children. GT’s Meredith Salisbury caught up with the author via e-mail to see what the fuss is all about.

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Women with breast or ovarian cancer living in medically underserved regions of the US are less likely to get recommended BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic testing, according to a new study.

Three immunology researchers are to receive this year's Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research, the Albany Times-Union reports.

In Genome Research this week: clonal evolution analysis of acute myeloid leukemia, computational pipeline to examine relationships between bacterial pathogens, and more.

Elephants may have "re-animated" a pseudogene to help stave off cancer, according to the New York Times.