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Psychiatric Genomics to Use High Throughput Genomics Array Kits

NEW YORK, Feb. 5-Psychiatric Genomics will use array kit products from Tucson, Ariz.-based High Throughput Genomics in its search for drugs to treat psychiatric disorders, the companies said on Jan. 31.

 

As part of the agreement, PsyGenomics will designate genes of interest to be included into the custom-made kits. The kits will be incorporated into PsyGenomics' own drug discovery platform.

 

Financial details of the arrangement were not revealed.

 

HTG's ArrayPlate kits, designed for drug discovery and diagnostic development, are 96-well universal array microplates with custom reagent kits. The plates are designed to allow multiple assays per well.

 

Psychiatric Genomics, based in Gaithersburg, Md., focuses on new treatments for mental illness. Its research includes novel gene discovery, high-throughput cellular screening, and lead candidate optimization.

 

The privately held company was founded in 2000. Oxford Bioscience Partners is the lead investor.

 

High Throughput Genomics was established as a subsidiary of Tucson combinatorial chemistry firm Systems Integration Drug Discovery Company in 1997. When that company was sold to San Diego's Discovery Partners International in 2001, HTG was spun off to SIDDCO shareholders. It is also privately held.

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