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Pressure Bio Licenses Protein Analysis IP from Battelle

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) - Pressure BioSciences has licensed rights to use technology developed by the Battelle Memorial Institute that PBI said can be used to improve systems for analyzing protein samples.
 
The technology, for which Battelle filed a patent this year, is related to a method and automated, in-line system using pressure and a pre-selected agent to obtain a digested sample faster than current methods while retaining the integrity of the sample throughout the preparatory process.
 
PBI believes that the technology will build upon and broaden its own pressure cycling technology portfolio. When used in combination with PBI’s technology, the company said, the Battelle methods could offer a direct approach to automated sample preparation, and that could lead to development of tools that could be integrated into liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry instruments for complete processing of proteins.
 
“New instruments based on the combination of this invention and PCT could become a front end to modern LC-MS instrumentation,” PBI VP of Research and Development Alex Lazarev said in a statement. “These could eliminate major bottlenecks in biological sample preparation for protein analysis, since they could obviate the need for the operator to manually load and unload samples during processing.”
 
Financial terms of the agreement were not released.
 

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