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Pressure Bio Lands SBIR Contract

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Pressure BioSciences has been awarded a grant of $110,000 from the National Institutes of Health for its pressure cycling technology, the company said today.

The Small Business Innovation Research grant, from the National Institute on Allergy and Infectious Diseases, is focused on funding development of sample preparation technology using pressure for microbiome studies and for clinical diagnostics. The company said that the research calls for PCT to be used to prepare all of the samples for the study.

If PCT is successful in those studies, the company said, it hopes to reel in a Phase II grant, which would be likely be for around $1 million over two years.

"This SBIR grant will help fund the development of novel, PCT-based sample preparation methods for an important NIH initiative," PBI VP of Marketing Nate Lawrence said in a statement.

If the PCT-based methods help in improving microbial analysis, Lawrence said, "We believe that PCT products could be adopted by many laboratories involved in the Human Microbiome Project, as well as others working in the area of microbe detection and analysis. We further believe that the development of rapid, PCT-based microbiological sample preparation methods could potentially open up significant clinical and research market opportunities for PBI."

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