Pink Hurts

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At the Harvard Business Review, Erasmus University marketing professor Stefano Puntoni says that seeing the color pink makes women less likely to think they'll get breast cancer, and therefore less likely to contribute money to cancer research. Puntoni showed a series of women ads dominated by the color pink and then asked them to rate how likely they thought they were to get breast cancer or give money to causes for curing cancer.

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