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PerkinElmer Lays off 265 in Second Quarter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – PerkinElmer laid off 265 employees during the second quarter, the company said in its Form 10-Q today.

In the document filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, it said that the reduction in workforce was part of a restructuring plan to move some of its operations into a newly established shared service center and to realign operations, R&D resources, and production resources as a result of previous acquisitions.

During the company's recent second quarter earnings conference call, PerkinElmer Chairman and CEO Robert Friel said that the firm had consolidated three North American facilities, "and efforts are underway to consolidate two additional legacy Caliper sites, further simplifying our operational footprint and improving our R&D efficiency."

All 265 employees being laid off were notified by June 30.

The restructuring resulted in a charge of $9.9 million pre-tax charge recognized by PerkinElmer during the second quarter in its Human Health segment, and an $8.8 million pre-tax charge recognized in its Environmental Health segment.

It said that it anticipates recognizing an additional $600,000 in incremental restructuring expenses in the future, resulting from one-time termination benefits.

The layoffs in the second quarter, during which PerkinElmer said revenues rose 4 percent year over year, come on top of 62 layoffs in the first quarter. In 2012, it cut its headcount by 437.

The Waltham, Mass.-based company has about 7,500 employees worldwide.

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