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PEOPLE: GenomeWeb s Weekly Personnel Roundup of the Genomics Sector: Mar 20, 2002

NEW YORK, March 20-Eric Eastman will be the first president of Morphochem's U.S. division, the company announced today. Eastman will also head the company's chemical genomics research center in Monmouth Junction, NJ.

 

Eastman was previously senior vice president and chief technology officer at Gene Logic, where he helped develop the company's gene expression analysis systems, managed R&D, and supported new drug target database activities.

 

Morphochem, headquartered in Munich, integrates multi-component reaction chemistry with tools in genetics, informatics, and pharmacology. The company was founded in 1996.

 


 

Cytogen subsidiary AxCell Biosciences said on Tuesday that it had added protein kinase specialist Tony Hunter to its scientific advisory board.

 

Hunter "will greatly benefit the progression of AxCell as a leading provider of signal transduction pathway information," said AxCell interim CEO Michael Becker in a statement.

 

Hunter is professor at the Salk Institute in San Diego. He is known for work studying the role of tyrosine kinases in cellular growth and tumor development.

 


 

Instrumentation and reagent company Oncosis has added Diversa's Karin Eastham to its board of directors, the company said Tuesday.

 

Eastham is secretary, senior vice president of finance, and chief financial officer of the genomics firm Diversa. She joined that company in May 1999 and led the firm's IPO in February 2000.

 

Prior to that, she has served as vice president of finance and administration and chief financial officer of CombiChem, and as vice president of finance and administration and chief financial officer of Cytel Corporation.

 

Oncosis' core technology, called Photosis, uses scanning cytometry, real-time image analysis, and lasers to identify, target, and process cells.

 

Oncosis, based in San Diego, Calif., is privately held.

 


 

Next month, Compugen's Hershel Safer will be joining Zetiq Technologies as head of the company's new bioinformatics department.

 

Zetiq, based in Rehovot, Israel, has developed a stain technology to differentiate between cancerous and noncancerous cells, based on metabolic differences. The company is applying this technique as a chemical screen in order to identify and develop non-cytotoxic "cancer regulating" drugs that can cause cancer cells to revert to normal. 

 

Safer was previously a research scientist with Tel Aviv-based Compugen, and has also been involved in bioinformatics projects at the Crown Human Genome Center at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot.



 

Perlegen Sciences said on Monday that it had added Philip Sussman as vice president, business development.

 

Sussman was brought on for his experience in business development and in establishing partnerships with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

 

Last year, Sussman was briefly president and chief executive officer at SIGA technologies, which works with bacterial surface proteins in order to produce new anti-infectives. Prior to that, he was executive vice president for corporate development at Memory Pharmaceuticals.

 

He was previously senior vice president at Cadus Pharmaceutical Corporation.

 

Perlegen, based in Mountain View, Calif., was spun off from Affymetrix in October 2000. The company is working to identify haplotypes and associate these with disease, health, and drug responses.

 


 

Margate, NJ-based GeneLink said on Monday that Harold Harrison will serve as the company's medical director and chief compliance officer.

 

Harrison will oversee and coordinate all medical compliance issues related to licensing.

 

He was previously corporate medical director of genetic services for Quest Diagnostics, and as medical director for biochemical, molecular, cytogenetic, and HLA labs at Genetrix, Inc., which was acquired by Genzyme in 1997.

 

GeneLink, a publicly held company, is developing a genetic profiling system to be used in developing nutritional, cosmetic, and other consumer products.

 


 

Genset Chief Financial Officer John Varian is leaving the firm for personal reasons, the Paris-based company said on March 15.

 

"I have decided to return to live in California, where I have maintained my home in San Francisco," said Varian in a statement.

 

Varian was involved in the company's efforts to move into genomics-based pharmaceutical development.

 

Sylvie Goujon, the firm's finance director, will act as interim CFO until the firm finds a replacement for Varian.

 

Genset is a publicly held company using genomics techniques to develop drug targets and candidates in CNS and metabolic disorders.

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