Penn State Team Unraveling Genetics Behind the Human Face | GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Genetic studies of admixed populations are providing new insights into the genetic basis for the wide range of facial traits observed in humans.

Pennsylvania State University biological anthropologist Mark Shriver and his team are using genetic analyses and a variety of three-dimensional facial mapping techniques to understand how genes and genetic ancestry influence normal human facial traits. That, in turn, may provide information about human natural selection and sexual selection and provide new resources for forensic investigations.

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