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Oxford University Pathologists to Use OGT Services for Immunology Study

NEW YORK, July 26 (GenomeWeb News) - Pathologists at the University of Oxford will use OGT Services to help them optimize probes for a certain study before selecting them for microarray-based projects, the company said today.

 

The study will focus on around 768 genes of the murine immune system with the aim of doubling the number in the "near future," the company said.

 

The researchers designed up to five probes for every gene, which OGT synthesized using its on-slide synthesis methodology, the company said in a statement. The university scientists then tested the probes in three different hybridizations, compared their functional performances, and modified them.

 

"This information helped us to select the probes that we will use in-house with the microarray infrastructure we already have in place," according to Nigel Saunders, lecturer in microbiology at Oxford's William Dunn School of Pathology.

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