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Open Biosystems Signs Deals for RNAi Technology with Cancer Research Institutes

NEW YORK, Dec. 19 (GenomeWeb News) - Open Biosystems said today that it has signed on Duke University, the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute, Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, and Fox Chase Cancer Center as customers for its short hairpin RNA libraries for the identification of cancer treatment options.

 

According to Open Biosystems, the RNAi libraries can be used to screen entire genomes in a high-throughput manner, identifying tumor suppressors and possible drug targets.

 

"Open Biosystems' shRNAmir libraries enable us to manipulate gene expression and probe gene function on a whole-genome scale, accelerating a wide range of basic and translational research programs, including cancer research," Thomas Burke, general manager of technologies at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, said in a statement. "Rather than spending limited time and resources designing, constructing, and characterizing RNAi reagents, our researchers can now select shRNAmir clones targeting genes of interest, and place these into functional assays accelerating research that may lead to advanced treatment options for cancer."

 

Specific terms of the deals were not disclosed.

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