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NIH to See Mild Increase in FY2005; Mad Cow Programs to Jump Nearly 40 Percent

NEW YORK, Feb. 2 (GenomeWeb News) - The National Institutes of Health will have around 2.6 percent more money to spend in fiscal year 2005 than it had in fiscal 2004 if Congress approves President Bush's budget, according to the Office of Management and Budget.

 

The NIH can expect its operating budget for fiscal 2005, which begins Oct. 1, to increase to $28.6 billion from $27.9 billion in fiscal 2004. The increase is slightly below the overall increase in the fiscal 2005 federal budget, which tipped the scales at $2.4 trillion--a 3.5-percent jump from fiscal 2004, the OMB said.

 

The budget also plans to set aside an additional $8.3 million to help the US Food and Drug Administration and the US Department of Agriculture "enhance enforcement" of federal regulations guarding against the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

 

This increase, which is 40 percent more than the FDA or USDA spent on similar work in fiscal 2004, also includes programs for identifying and tracking BSE in cattle. Several genomic-based technologies are currently used to identify and keep track of cattle populations suspected of being infected with the neurological disorder.

 

Read the complete budget proposal here.

The Scan

Could Mix It Up

The US Food and Drug Administration is considering a plan that would allow for the mixing-and-matching of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines and boosters, the New York Times says.

Closest to the Dog

New Scientist reports that extinct Japanese wolf appears to be the closest known wild relative of dogs.

Offer to Come Back

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports that the University of Tennessee is offering Anming Hu, a professor who was acquitted of charges that he hid ties to China, his position back.

PNAS Papers on Myeloid Differentiation MicroRNAs, Urinary Exosomes, Maize Domestication

In PNAS this week: role of microRNAs in myeloid differentiation, exosomes in urine, and more.