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NIH Funds Three Metabolomics Resource Centers

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Institutes of Health has provided tens of millions of dollars in new funding to support three new Comprehensive Metabolomics Centers at Mayo Clinic, the University of Kentucky, and the University of Florida that will support metabolomics research in their regions.

These three centers will receive an estimated $9 million to $10 million each over the next five years to create resources and initiate research programs that will ramp up the national metabolomics science capabilities.

Funded by the NIH Common Fund and Coordinated by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, these centers in Minnesota, Kentucky, and Florida will serve as metabolomics hubs and resources for research around the country.

They will provide a range of resources and training programs, and will support a variety of initiatives, including providing metabolomics-related services, such as biomarker identification, bioinformatics analyses, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance and other imaging services.

Last year, NIH provided $14.3 million to fund the launch of three other metabolomics resource centers at the University of Michigan, the Research Triangle Institute, and the University of California, Davis.

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