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NIH Commercialization Assistance Program Aimed at SBIR Awardees

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Institutes of Health said today it has renewed a program aimed to help small life sciences businesses that have been recent or current Small Business Innovation Research Phase II awardees move their products or services toward the market.
 
The Commercialization Assistance Program, now in its fifth year, will last until June 2009.
 
The CAP program is designed to help small and promising life science companies develop commercial businesses and develop their products for the market. Through a contract with the Larta Institute of Los Angeles, the CAP will provide participants with individualized assistance in reaching their goals.
 
The ten-month program will offer two tracks: the Commercialization Training Track, or CTT, and the Accelerator Commercialization Track, or ACT.
 
The CTT is aimed at providing training and mentoring from industry and investment professionals, and the ACT is geared toward helping participants achieve clear and specific near-term objectives and plans, using experts with current market experience.
 
All NIH SBIR awardees that have a Phase II award that is active or that was active in the past five years are eligible for the program.
 
The deadline for applications for the program is Sept. 26. More information is available here.
 
 

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