Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

NHGRI Scientists Follow Trent to TGen; Incyte CSO Joins diaDexus Board; and others

NEW YORK, Feb. 19 - TGen, Arizona's new Translational Genomics Research Institute, has filled out its staff with 23 scientists, research assistants, and technicians, according to a company spokeswoman.

 

Four of these scientists, Michael Bittner, Spyro Mousses, Pamela Pollock, and Jeff Touchman, come from NHGRI, where TGen director Jeffrey Trent was scientific director before leaving last June.

 

Bittner has been appointed TGen's senior research investigator in bioinformatics, and will use informatics to study cell pathogenesis in silico. Mousses has been named to head up TGen's cancer drug development laboratory. He has published recently on the use of microarrays for gene expression analysis in prostate cancer and prostate cancer therapy. Pollock, TGen's new associate investigator in the area of melanoma research, will focus on the factors that cause melanomas to form and develop. She previously worked in the cancer genetics branch at NHGRI. Touchman, who will be the executive director of the DNA sequencing core, previously headed up a sequencing center at NHGRI.

 

TGen has also appointed Dietrich Stephan as a senior research investigator and director of its Neurogenomics program. Stephan previously served as co-director of Johns Hopkins' University's Children's NationalMedicalCenterMicroarrayCenter.

 

Additionally, Edward Suh, formerly of MIT and the NHGRI, is the CIO of TGen's Center for Computational Bioscience; and Michael Berens, who has been a principal investigator in neuro-oncology at Phoenix's Barrow Neurological Institute is the institute's vice president of research.


 

Incyte president and CSO Robert Stein was appointed to the board of privately held drug discovery company diaDexus, the company said today. Stein also serves on the board of Geron, and is a member of the University of California President's Board on Science and Innovation. Previous to joining Incyte, Stein was executive VP of RD at DuPont Pharmaceuticals. He has also worked at Ligand Pharmaceuticals and Merck.


 

Microarray software maker Silicon Genetics has appointed Gregory Kinch as vice president of sales and services. Kinch comes to the Redwood City, Calif., company from Genomic Solutions, (now a unit of Harvard Bioscience) where he was executive vice president of sales and marketing.


 

ActivX Biosciences of La Jolla, Calif., has promoted David Campbell to senior vice president of chemical sciences, from vice president of chemistry, the company announced Feb. 18. Campbellreceives the promotion after leading a team that designed chemical capture and labeling probes for certain protein families. Before joining ActivX in 2001, Campbellwas director of discovery chemistry at Bayer. He has also worked at Affymax Research Institute.


 

Genomics Collaborative of Cambridge, Mass. has appointed Gregory Sullivan as director of business development and sales, the company said Feb. 18. Before joining GCI, Sullivan co-founded a a marketing consulting firm, and previously served as medical director of the the Longevity Institute in Montclair, NJ.


 

Deltagen said Feb. 13th that its CEO, William Matthews, had resigned.

 

The office of board chairman Constantine Anagnostopoulos will manage the company until it finds a new CEO, Deltagen said.

 

Matthews, a co-founder of Deltagen, has served as CEO since 1998.

The Scan

Boosters Chasing Variants

The New York Times reports that an FDA advisory panel is to weigh updated booster vaccines for COVID-19.

Not Yet

The World Health Organization says monkeypox is not yet a global emergency, the Washington Post reports.

More Proposed for Federal Research

Science reports that US House of Representatives panels are seeking to increase federal research funding.

PLOS Papers on Breast Cancer Metastasis, Left-Sided Cardiac Defects, SARS-CoV-2 Monitoring

In PLOS this week: link between breast cancer metastasis and CLIC4, sequencing analysis of left-sided cardiac defects, and more.