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NHGRI To Award $10M for New Sequencing Technologies in 2006

NEW YORK, Dec. 19 (GenomeWeb News) - The National Human Genome Research Institute has published six requests for applications for next-generation genome sequencing technologies.

 

As GenomeWeb News reported last week, the research scope for these RFAs is the same as those issued in 2004, and focus on genome sequencing.

 

The following are the six requests published on the National Institutes of Health web site:

 

RFA-HG-05-003, a reissue of last year's HG-04-002, is titled, "Near-Term Technology Development for Genome Sequencing." NHGRI intends to commit approximately $2 million in fiscal year 2006 to fund two to seven projects, for a project period of two to three years.

 

"Current technologies are able to produce the sequence of a mammalian-sized genome of the desired data quality for $10 to $50 million," said the National Institutes of Health web site. "The goal of this initiative is to reduce costs by at least two orders of magnitude."

 

Information on RFA-HG-05-003 can be found here.

 

RFA-HG-05-004, a reissue of last year's HG-04-003, is titled, "Revolutionary Genome Sequencing Technologies - The $1000 Genome." NHGRI intends to commit approximately $2 million in fiscal year 2006 to fund two to seven projects, for a project period of three to five years.

 

The initiative looks to develop genome sequencing technologies so that in ten years, a mammalian-sized genome could be sequenced for approximately $1,000.

 

Information on RFA-HG-05-004 can be found here.

 

RFA-HG-06-002, titled, "Near-Term Technology Development for Genome Sequencing - SBIR" and RFA-HG-06-004, titled, "Revolutionary Genome Sequencing Technologies - The $1000 Genome - SBIR" are related SBIR grants. NHGRI intends to commit approximately $1.5 million to fund one to six grants responding to RFA-HG-06-002 and RFA-HG-06-004. The project periods should cover two to five years.

 

Information on RFA-HG-06-002 can be found here and information on RFA-HG-06-004 can be found here.

 

RFA-HG-06-003, titled, "Near-Term Technology Development for Genome Sequencing - STTR" and RFA-HG-06-005, titled, "Revolutionary Genome Sequencing Technologies - The $1000 Genome - STTR" are related STTR grants. NHGRI intends to commit approximately $1.5 million to fund one to six grants responding to RFA-HG-06-003 and RFA-HG-06-005. The project periods should cover two to three years.

 

"It is anticipated that emerging technologies are sufficiently advanced that, with additional investment, it may be possible to achieve proof of principle or even early-stage commercialization of multiple different approaches for genome-scale sequencing within five years," said the NIH web site.

 

Information on RFA-HG-06-003 can be found here and information on RFA-HG-06-005 can be found here.

 

Applications for the SBIR and STTR grants must be submitted electronically via grants.gov using the SF424 Research and Related forms and the SF 424 SBIR/STTR Application Guide.

 

The application deadline for all RFAs is Feb. 17, 2006, and the anticipated start date is Sept. 29, 2006.

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