It could be called the blog post heard ’round the world — or at least around the United States Patent and Trademark Office. It all started back in July of 2005, when New York Law School Institute professor Beth Noveck posted a critique on her blog about the USPTO’s patent application review system. In it, she pointed out several examples of what she viewed as chronic flaws in the application system, including the fact that multiple patents have been given for the same invention as well as the increasing number of multi-million-dollar lawsuits resulting from such erroneous patents.

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23andMe's Anne Wojcicki ponders DNA and what it means to be human in a New York Times essay.

A new estimate places the last universal common ancestor to life on Earth as living 3.9 billion years ago, Inverse reports.

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