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New Centers Join Children's Genes, Environment Study

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Five learning institutions and a children's hospital have joined the National Children's Study and will begin working in their regions with potential volunteers for the project, which will study the genetics and environments of 100,000 children from their fetal phases through young adulthood.

The goal of the NCS is to create a comprehensive study of how genes and the environment interact and affect children's health.

The five new Vanguard Centers joining the study in this recruiting phase include: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; South Dakota State University; the University of California, Irvine; the University of Utah; and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the Medical College of Wisconsin.

The NCS is run by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Two other Vanguard Centers for the study that were announced in January and included the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

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