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NDIS Approves Promega's Human Identification System

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National DNA Index System has approved Promega's PowerPlex Fusion System for use in laboratories producing DNA records for NDIS, the company said today.

NDIS, part of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Combined DNA Index System, is the national database that contains more than 10 million offender profiles used by criminal investigators nationwide.

The STR-based PowerPlex Fusion System was launched last September and is a 24-locus multiplex system incorporating common and informative loci used globally. Streamlined protocols are included for amplifying extracted DNA, as well as DNA from sample types used for database and paternity testing, Promega said, adding that reduced cycling times and sampler preparation times shorten the total time required for process sampling.

"Our evaluation of the PowerPlex Fusion System and involvement in its developmental validation allowed us to directly confirm the value of this multiplex for forensic sample analysis," Jeffrey Nye of the Michigan State Police Forensic Science Division, the sponsoring laboratory for NDIS approval submission for PowerPlex Fusion, said in a statement. "NDIS approval will mean that laboratories can use this assay today to meet current standards and have the additional markers already in place for future database expansion."

Last month, Madison, Wis.-based Promega said that NDIS approved its PowerPlex Y23 System.

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