Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

More Trouble for Thompson

Premium

Craig Thompson — CEO and president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and noted cancer researcher — was accused in December of taking research that belonged to the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, and using it to start a company focused on cancer metabolism research and the development of new treatments. The institute said Thompson stole the research and made $110 million from it, and filed suit against him for $1 billion in damages.

Now, UPenn itself has also filed suit against Thompson, saying he "failed to share intellectual property from his discoveries with the university as he was required to do," reports ScienceInsider's Eliot Marshall. "Instead, Penn claims, Thompson published his group's findings of variant cancer cell enzymes in Nature and Cancer Cell while helping a private company seek patents on the discoveries." Both lawsuits have included Agios Pharmaceuticals — the company Thompson helped found — as a defendant.

Thompson says all the allegations are without merit, and tells Marshall he is "disappointed" that Penn would make such accusations without confirming their validity with him first. An Agios spokesperson also tells Marshall that the company has done nothing wrong.

The Scan

Steps for Quick Review

The US Food and Drug Administration is preparing for the quick review of drugs and vaccines for the Omicron variant, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Moving Away From Using Term 'Race'

A new analysis finds that geneticists are using the term "race" in their papers less than in years past, as Science reports.

Point of the Program

The Guardian writes that some scientists have called the design of a UK newborn sequencing program into question.

Science Papers Present Multi-Omic Analysis of Lung Cells, Regulation of Cardiomyocyte Proliferation

In Science this week: a multi-omic analysis of lung cells focuses on RIT1-regulated pathways, and more.