Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

More Trouble for Thompson

Premium

Craig Thompson — CEO and president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and noted cancer researcher — was accused in December of taking research that belonged to the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, and using it to start a company focused on cancer metabolism research and the development of new treatments. The institute said Thompson stole the research and made $110 million from it, and filed suit against him for $1 billion in damages.

Now, UPenn itself has also filed suit against Thompson, saying he "failed to share intellectual property from his discoveries with the university as he was required to do," reports ScienceInsider's Eliot Marshall. "Instead, Penn claims, Thompson published his group's findings of variant cancer cell enzymes in Nature and Cancer Cell while helping a private company seek patents on the discoveries." Both lawsuits have included Agios Pharmaceuticals — the company Thompson helped found — as a defendant.

Thompson says all the allegations are without merit, and tells Marshall he is "disappointed" that Penn would make such accusations without confirming their validity with him first. An Agios spokesperson also tells Marshall that the company has done nothing wrong.

The Scan

Nucleotide Base Detected on Near-Earth Asteroid

Among other intriguing compounds, researchers find the nucleotide uracil, a component of RNA sequences, in samples collected from the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu, as they report in Nature Communications.

Clinical Trial Participants, Investigators Point to Importance of Clinical Trial Results Reporting in Canadian Study

Public reporting on clinical trial results is crucial, according to qualitative interviews with clinical trial participants, investigators, and organizers from three provinces appearing in BMJ Open.

Old Order Amish Analysis Highlights Autozygosity, Potential Ties to Blood Measures

Researchers in BMC Genomics see larger and more frequent runs-of-homozygosity in Old Order Amish participants, though only regional autozygosity coincided with two blood-based measures.

Suicidal Ideation-Linked Loci Identified Using Million Veteran Program Data

Researchers in PLOS Genetics identify risk variants within and across ancestry groups with a genome-wide association study involving veterans with or without a history of suicidal ideation.