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More Fiber!

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A new study in the Journal of Nutrition may provide people with yet another reason to eat more fiber, says MedicalXpress. According to researchers from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia's national science agency, it's not just dietary fiber that's important, but diverse sources of dietary fiber, including sources of resistant starch. Western diets are usually low in fiber. Though Australian diets are usually have a higher fiber content than the typical Western diet does, bowel cancer is still a problem for that population, MedicalXpress says. CSIRO researchers say this is because Australians don't eat enough resistant starch. "We studied various sources of resistant starch, including corn and wheat, and the results suggest they could all protect against DNA damage in the colon, which is what can cause cancer," says study author David Topping. "The recommended intake of resistant starch is around 20 grams a day, which is almost four times greater than a typical Western diet provides. Twenty grams is equivalent to eating three cups of cooked lentils," MedicalXpress adds. "Resistant starch is sometimes called the third type of dietary fiber (in addition to soluble and insoluble fiber) and is found in legumes, some wholegrain breads and cereals, firm bananas and cooked and cooled potatoes, pasta, and rice."

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