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Make it Stop!

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A new study published in Nature shows that there is a gene, which is switched off in about 15 percent of pancreatic cancers, that may act as a "brake" to stop these tumors from growing, suggesting that a new class of drugs may be used to turn this gene back on in some aggressive pancreatic cancers, reports BBC News. The gene, USP9x, normally stops cells from dividing uncontrollably. Working with mouse models, the researchers found that the fault that causes the gene to be turned off is due to a defect in the chemical tags on the surface of the DNA, BBC says. "Drugs which strip away these tags are already showing promise in lung cancer and this study suggests they could also be effective [in pancreatic cancer]," study senior author David Tuveson, from Cancer Research UK, tells BBC. Co-author David Adams, of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, adds that "this study strengthens our emerging understanding that we must also look into the biology of cells to identify all the genes that play a role in cancer."

The Scan

Support for Moderna Booster

An FDA advisory committee supports authorizing a booster for Moderna's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, CNN reports.

Testing at UK Lab Suspended

SARS-CoV-2 testing at a UK lab has been suspended following a number of false negative results.

J&J CSO to Step Down

The Wall Street Journal reports that Paul Stoffels will be stepping down as chief scientific officer at Johnson & Johnson by the end of the year.

Science Papers Present Proteo-Genomic Map of Human Health, Brain Tumor Target, Tool to Infer CNVs

In Science this week: gene-protein-disease map, epigenomic and transcriptomic approach highlights potential therapeutic target for gliomas, and more