Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

LION Releases genomeScout 1.0

NEW YORK, Sept 7 - LION bioscience (Nasdaq: LEON) said on Thursday it had released genomeSCOUT 1.0, a software package for genome comparison and analysis.

genomeSCOUT uses comparative genomics to help researchers gain information about the   functionality of as well as the differences between the growing number of sequenced genomes. The software also allows users to discover unique genes in any set of organisms, and to assign functions to genes and to compare metabolic pathways in different organisms.

Such findings could lead to the identification of microbial drug targets and in the development of vaccines.

genomeSCOUT is based on LION’s SRS Data Integration System, which supports more than 400 public and private databases and applications.

Based in Heidelberg, Germany LION bioscience develops R&D data analysis and information management systems for the life science sector. The company has alliances with such companies as Aventis (NYSE: AVE), Bayer, Celera (NYSE: CRA) and Sumitomo Pharmaceuticals.

The Scan

UK Team Presents Genetic, Epigenetic Sequencing Method

Using enzymatic DNA preparation steps, researchers in Nature Biotechnology develop a strategy for sequencing DNA, along with 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, on existing sequencers.

DNA Biobank Developed for French Kidney Donors, Recipients

The KiT-GENIE biobank described in the European Journal of Human Genetics contains DNA samples, genotyping profiles, immune patterns, and clinical features for thousands of kidney donors or transplant recipients in Nantes, France.

Cardiometabolic Disease May Have Distinct Associations With Microbial Metabolites in Blood, Gut

By analyzing gut microbes in combination with related metabolites in feces and blood, researchers in Nature Communications found distinct cardiometabolic disease relationships at each site.

Study Reveals New Details About Genetics of Major Cause of Female Infertility

Researchers in Nature Medicine conducted a whole-exome sequencing study of mote than a thousand patients with premature ovarian insufficiency.