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Let's Be More Precise

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Many researchers say the word 'cancer' is out of date and too imprecise, says The New York Times' Gina Kolata. As researchers and clinicians have learned over the years, the word cancer is used to designate a number of different diseases with different causes, symptoms, treatments, and likely outcomes. "It is like saying a person has 'mental illness' when he or she might have schizophrenia or mild depression or an eating disorder," Kolata says. So some experts are now recommending that the medical establishment stop using the word cancer. Especially now that screening is widespread and researchers are getting more adept at early detection of some cancers, it may not even be correct to call these conditions 'cancer' anymore, she adds.

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.