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LabCorp to Market Lung Cancer Dx from Duke

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Laboratory Corporation of America plans to commercialize a blood-based assay for early-stage lung cancer detection that was developed by Duke University Medical Center, the company said today.
 
Working under an exclusive license agreement, Burlington, NC-based LabCorp plans to market the serum protein assay, which is based on research published in a recent issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The assay could serve as a useful complement to imaging studies, the company said. 
 
"There is an enormous unmet medical need related to the diagnosis of lung cancer in the earliest stages when it is most treatable," Duke radiology professor Edward Patz said in a statement. "Our goal is to develop a cutting-edge technology that when combined with other modalities such as CT imaging can better differentiate true cancers from benign nodules."
 
Financial terms of the agreement were not released.

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