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For the Kids

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Researchers from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine have published "the world's largest collection of genetic data on childhood cancers," reports BBC News' Emily Selvadurai. The researchers, who formed the US Pediatric Cancer Genome Project in 2010, mapped the whole germline genomes and cancer genomes of 260 pediatric cancer patients in an effort to find all the differences between their germline and tumor DNA. The work, which they discuss in Nature Genetics, has already led to a new treatment for retinoblastoma, Selvadurai says. The PCGP Consortium has also made its data available to researchers worldwide at the European Genome-phenome Archive website.

"We have identified unusual, 'cryptic' changes in many patients' cancer cells that we would not have found using other methods," says Richard Wilson, a member of the consortium and head of the Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine, in a statement. "We are pleased to be able to share this data with the research community in the hope that others can build upon our initial discoveries."

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.