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Ken Howard, John S. MacNeil, Keith Ball, Charles Clark

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Ken Howard, based in San Francisco, is senior reporter for GenomeWeb. He originally wrote “Better Beamlines in Berkeley,” p. 59, for GenomeWeb.com. While trying not to appear alarmist, he believes the robots are taking over.

After a nine-month stint as a reporter for GenomeWeb.com and a year as editor of ProteoMonitor newsletter, John S. MacNeil is moving to glossier pastures. At the end of October, John will join the staff of Genome Technology as a senior editor. In this month’s issue, John contributed a profile of Julio Celis, (“Julio Celis, 2D Gel Holdout,” p. 40) one of the many proteomics researchers he has had the pleasure of interviewing over the past year.

Keith Ball has been a photographer in the Oklahoma City, Okla., area for 25 years, working on local, regional, and national assignments. Though primarily working in the advertising arena, Keith also produces fine art photography and has been involved in several solo and group art shows throughout his career. While shooting for this assignment, he said, “One of the great things about my job is getting to photograph fascinating people doing fascinating things.”

Charles Clark, “Minding the Storage,” p. 79, is a freelance writer with 26 years’ experience in IT feature writing for publications such as Network World, ComputerWorld, Network Magazine, CIO, Solutions Integrator, and Storage Magazine. He has an AB in English with a minor in biochemical sciences from Harvard.

The Scan

Missed Early Cases

A retrospective analysis of blood samples suggests early SARS-CoV-2 infections may have been missed in the US, the New York Times reports.

Limited Journal Editor Diversity

A survey finds low diversity among scientific and medical journal editors, according to The Scientist.

How Much of a Threat?

Science writes that need for a provision aimed at shoring up genomic data security within a new US bill is being questioned.

PNAS Papers on Historic Helicobacter Spread, Brain Development, C. difficile RNAs

In PNAS this week: Helicobacter genetic diversity gives insight into human migrations, gene expression patterns of brain development, and more.