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JGI Announces Community Sequencing Program Selections

NEW YORK, Aug. 24 (GenomeWeb News) - The US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute announced today that it has selected 23 organisms for sequencing over the coming year under its community sequencing program.

 

JGI launched the community sequencing program in January.

 

"The CSP selections represent a rich collection of microorganisms as well as higher plants and animals that inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems," Eddy Rubin, JGI director, said in a statement. "By making JGI's powerful resources available to non-traditional end-users of sequence through the CSP we hope to advance knowledge across such vital topics as alternative energy production and bioremediation, and to address important questions of evolution and development."

 

Among the organisms being sequenced under the JGI program are the moss Physcomitrella patens, the leech Helobdella, the polychaete worm, Capitella, and the mollusk Lottia.

 

The complete list of organisms being sequenced can be found here.

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