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Isis GeneTrove Strikes Functional Genomics Alliance with Amgen

NEW YORK, Jan. 3 — Isis Pharmaceuticals' GeneTrove division has launched a functional genomics alliance with Amgen, Isis said on Thursday.

 

Terms of the partnership call for Amgen to access Isis' functional genomics capabilities, including its antisense gene function and target validation expertise. The biotech behemoth will also apply technologies that Isis has developed with RNase H, a cellular enzyme that cleaves RNA in an RNA/DNA duplex.

 

The partnership builds upon the two companies' antisense drug-discovery collaboration, announced in December. Under that agreement, Amgen will develop and commercialize antisense drugs developed with Isis' gene target-inhibition chemistry. Isis, of Carlsbad, Calif., will receive milestone payments and royalties on any sales.

 

Isis' GeneTrove division, which provides antisense inhibitors for cell culture and animal disease models, is constructing a gene-function database that now includes results from inhibition studies of 10,000 human genes. Its other functionalization and target validation collaborations include agreements with Eli Lilly, Celera, Abbott, Johnson & Johnson, Aventis, and Chiron.

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