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Invitrogen, ABI Combo to Have Four Core Divisions

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – As the acquisition of Applied Biosystems by Invitrogen draws closer, the firms announced after the close of the market on Wednesday that the newly merged firm would operate under four core divisions: molecular biology systems, genetic systems, cell systems, and mass spectrometry systems.
 
They also announced the management team that will oversee these four divisions and other functions.
 
The molecular biology systems division will be led by Peter Dansky, who currently serves as leader of ABI’s molecular and cell biology functional analysis division. It will include the workflows of both firms related to molecular biology, such as gene expression, genotyping, gene regulation, and proteomics.
 
The genetic systems division will be led by Kip Miller, who currently serves as leader of Invitrogen’s Biodiscovery division. It will include ABI’s capillary electrophoresis and SOLiD sequencing systems, as well as Invitrogen’s third-generation sequencing development program.
 
The cell systems division will be led by Nicolas Barthelemy, who currently heads Invitrogen’s cell systems division. It will include Invitrogen’s current cell systems operations and ABI’s Poros and Tropix business lines.
 
The mass spectrometry division will be led by Laura Lauman, who currently leads ABI’s proteomics and small molecule division, and will house ABI’s mass spec business.
 
As previously announced, Invitrogen Chairman and CEO Greg Lucier will hold the same titles for the merged company, which will retain the Applied Biosystems name. ABI President and COO Mark Stevenson will retain those titles following the merger.
 
Earlier in the day, Invitrogen said that it expects to complete within the next seven days a $2.65 billion bank facility to partially fund its roughly $6.7 billion acquisition of Applied Biosystems.
 

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