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Incogen Wins $2M Award from National Institute for Standards and Technology

NEW YORK, July 30 – Incogen received a $2 million grant from the National Institute for Standards and Technology to develop and implement a homogenous protocol based on XML and web services technology, the company announced.

The grant comes under NIST’s Advanced Technology Program, and is meant to support the technology to provide scientists with easy access to various tools used in genomics research.

“The lack of interoperable tools and data integration has long been a thorn in the sides of both bioinformaticists and biologists,” Maciek Sasinowski, CEO of Incogen, said in a statement. “We’re quite excited and grateful that an organization like NIST realizes the scope of the challenge and agrees that our proposed approach provides the community with the best attempt to solve that problem.”

Incogen, based in Clemson, South Carolina, is active in the Interoperable Informatics Infrastructure Consortium. I3C was proposed in February by Sun Microsystems, the Biotechnology Industry Organization, the National Cancer Institute, and several commercial bioinformatics vendors to support an industry-wide effort to develop an open platform for the life sciences. The collaboration currently has 47 participants, including Affymetrix, AP Biotech, DoubleTwist, the European Bioinformatics Institute, Gene Logic, IBM, Incyte, LabBook, Millennium Pharmaceuticals, the National Cancer Institute, Oracle, and the Whitehead Institute. 

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