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Hoisted by Their Own Petard

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Some cancer cells eat sugar, glucose to be exact. But what happens when cancer cells eat the wrong kind of sugar? As researchers in Japan and California found out, it poisons them and leaves them vulnerable to attack, reports New Scientist. The researchers found that tricking the cells into consuming 2-deoxyglucose, a glucose-like sugar, "dislodges a protein within the cell that guards a suicide switch," New Scientist says. Then the switch can be turned on, and the cancer cell destroyed. This could work for several different kinds of cancer, the researcher say in their study published in Cancer Research. When this approach was tried in a mouse model of human cancer, it made the aggressive human prostate tumors "virtually disappear within days," New Scientist adds.

The Scan

Self-Reported Hearing Loss in Older Adults Begins Very Early in Life, Study Says

A JAMA Otolaryngology — Head & Neck Surgery study says polygenic risk scores associated with hearing loss in older adults is also associated with hearing decline in younger groups.

Genome-Wide Analysis Sheds Light on Genetics of ADHD

A genome-wide association study meta-analysis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder appearing in Nature Genetics links 76 genes to risk of having the disorder.

MicroRNA Cotargeting Linked to Lupus

A mouse-based study appearing in BMC Biology implicates two microRNAs with overlapping target sites in lupus.

Enzyme Involved in Lipid Metabolism Linked to Mutational Signatures

In Nature Genetics, a Wellcome Sanger Institute-led team found that APOBEC1 may contribute to the development of the SBS2 and SBS13 mutational signatures in the small intestine.