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Hoisted by Their Own Petard

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Some cancer cells eat sugar, glucose to be exact. But what happens when cancer cells eat the wrong kind of sugar? As researchers in Japan and California found out, it poisons them and leaves them vulnerable to attack, reports New Scientist. The researchers found that tricking the cells into consuming 2-deoxyglucose, a glucose-like sugar, "dislodges a protein within the cell that guards a suicide switch," New Scientist says. Then the switch can be turned on, and the cancer cell destroyed. This could work for several different kinds of cancer, the researcher say in their study published in Cancer Research. When this approach was tried in a mouse model of human cancer, it made the aggressive human prostate tumors "virtually disappear within days," New Scientist adds.

The Scan

Call to Look Again

More than a dozen researchers penned a letter in Science saying a previous investigation into the origin of SARS-CoV-2 did not give theories equal consideration.

Not Always Trusted

In a new poll, slightly more than half of US adults have a great deal or quite a lot of trust in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Hill reports.

Identified Decades Later

A genetic genealogy approach has identified "Christy Crystal Creek," the New York Times reports.

Science Papers Report on Splicing Enhancer, Point of Care Test for Sexual Transmitted Disease

In Science this week: a novel RNA structural element that acts as a splicing enhancer, and more.