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GTG Sues PreventionGenetics, Alleging IP Infringement

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Genetic Technologies is suing PreventionGenetics in federal court claiming patent infringement.

Melbourne, Australia-based GTG filed its lawsuit in the US District Court, Western District of Wisconsin on Nov. 2 alleging PreventionGenetics infringes US Patent No. 5,612,179, titled "Intron sequence analysis method for detection of adjacent and remote locus alleles as haplotypes." The patent was assigned by an entity called Genetype AG to GTG. The patent was originally assigned to Genetype by the technology's inventor Malcolm Simons.

Based in Marshfield, Wis., PreventionGenetics provides clinical DNA testing, DNA banking, and research genomics services, it said on its website, adding that it provides clinical sequencing tests for more than 500 genes.

GTG is asking the court for damages of an unspecified amount as well as other costs.

The '179 patent is the subject of numerous lawsuits filed by GTG alleging patent infringement. Most recently, it sued Genesis Genetics Institute, Reprogenetics, Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, and IVF Institute in separate actions.

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