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MDMA, the designer drug known as Ecstasy, is usually associated with college kids, rave parties, and glowsticks. But researchers from the University of Birmingham in the UK say the drug could eventually be used to treat leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma, reports The Telegraph's Nick Collins. Ecstasy is already known to be effective against some white blood cell cancers, but the dosage would have to be 100 times stronger than normal to be effective at suppressing cancer growth, Collins says — and that would probably kill most people. In the new study, published in Investigational New Drugs, the research team says that if the stronger MDMA can be made safe for human consumption, it would be very efficient at treating cancer.

The Scan

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