GenomeWeb Feature: Slow but Steady, Molecular Tools Make Their Way into Criminal Forensics | GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The story of modern molecular forensics begins, unlikely enough, with a hunk of seal meat.

In 1984, University of Leicester professor Alec Jeffreys, the inventor of DNA fingerprinting, was at the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge working to isolate the gene for myoglobin from a grey seal specimen. His plan was to use the seal gene – which is highly expressed – as a probe for isolating the less abundant human version.

Get the full story

This story is free
for registered users

Registering provides access to this and other free content.

Register now.

Already have an account?
Login Now.

An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Research funding in Canada is to remain mostly the same, ScienceInsider reports.

In Science this week: random DNA replication errors play role in cancer, and more.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarks on an open-access publishing path.