As usual, the 2005 annual meeting of the Biotechnology Industry Organization resembled a circus. Aside from the usual throng of protesters in the street bellowing against the use of genetically modified foodstuffs (several people were arrested), the exhibit hall hummed as thousands of attendees hobnobbed and networked with representatives from biotechnology companies from across the globe — and the countless regional business development officers accompanying them.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

GenomeWeb Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

Already a GenomeWeb Premium member? Login Now.
Or, See if your institution qualifies for premium access.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

Researchers have found that the i-motif shape of DNA previously observed in the lab also exists in human cells, and that it may serve a purpose.

In PNAS this week: a genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analysis of the tea plant, Arabidopsis thaliana's adaptations to specific local environments, and more.

In an against-all-odds twist, a researcher studying exceeding rare FOXG1 mutations discovers her daughter has the syndrome.

An effort by Genomics Medicine Ireland is creating a database of diseases based on the genomics of people in Ireland. It now is looking into the possibility of including Scotland in its work.