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Gene Express Licenses USF IP for Lung Cancer Predictive Test

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Gene Express said Monday that it has licensed technology from the University of South Florida that it will use to develop a prognostic test to be used in the treatment of lung cancer.
 
The company licensed gene expression technology related to the ERCC1 and RRM1 genes from USF’s Division of Patents & Licensing Research Office.
 
USF researchers have found that ERCC1 activity can be used to predict survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and have found that RRM1 is a determinant of malignant behavior in NSCLC.
 
Gene Express said USF’s scientists have determined that knowing the level of expression of RRM1 allows for better-informed decisions than currently used predictors of tumor stage, performance status, and weight loss.
 
The Toledo, Ohio-based company said it plans to develop the prognostic test and commercialize it over the next two years.
 
Gene Express expects to complete clinical validation to correlate gene expression with chemoresistance for cisplatin treatment and to submit a 510(k) class II prognostic test to the US Food and Drug Administration by May 2009. The firm hopes to obtain approval from the FDA by August 2009 and have the test on the market by the end of next year.

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