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GE Licenses IP to Cellular Dynamics Enabling iPS Cell Assay, Model Development

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – GE Healthcare Life Sciences and Cellular Dynamics today announced a licensing deal allowing CDI to develop, manufacture, and sell cellular assays and models derived from induced pluripotent stem cells for drug discovery and toxicity screening.

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"We believe it is important that stem cell-based assays are available to researchers so that progress can be made in drug discovery; clarity and freedom to operate is fundamental to advancing the use of such assays," Amr Abid, general manager of Cell Technologies for GE Healthcare Life Sciences, a business unit of GE Healthcare, said in a statement. "GE Healthcare believes that such agreements are the next step to enabling the wider industry to benefit from the use of this key intellectual property without violating patent rights."

CDI, a developer and manufacturer of human cells based on iPS cell technology, currently offers iCell Cardiomyocytes, iCell Neurons, iCell Endothelial Cells, and iCell Hepatocytes. The Madison, Wis.-based firm also offers MyCell Services, a custom cell manufacturing service.

Today's agreement follows a deal between GE Healthcare and Geron announced in October to develop cellular assays and models derived from embryonic stem cells.

"The IP space surrounding stem cell technology is complex," Cellular Dynamics CEO Bob Palay added in the statement. "With the licensing of the GE-Geron intellectual property portfolio, CDI now has more than 700 licensed or owned patents and patent applications. We have built our IP portfolio intending to ensure broad freedom to operate and to offer customers products that they can use with confidence and the knowledge that their subsequent discoveries are protected by this IP portfolio."

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