Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

The Gatekeeper?

Premium

A new study in Cancer Cell suggests the LKB1 gene could help keep melanoma cells from becoming metastatic, reports HealthDay News. When researchers from the University of North Carolina's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center inactivated LKB1 in both human and mouse tumors, non-aggressive melanoma cells became highly metastatic, HealthDay says. Inactivation also played a role in lung metastasis, but not as dramatically as in melanoma, HealthDay adds. "Although we are not totally certain how LKB1 loss promotes metastasis in multiple cancer types, one important effect is the loss of LKB1 starts a chain reaction, activating a family of proteins called SRC kinases, which are known to drive metastasis," said study leader Norman Sharpless in a press release. "Loss of LKB1 occurs in about 30 percent of lung cancer and 10 percent of melanoma. ... These data suggest LKB1-deficient cancers will be more likely to metastasize, and therefore more likely to be incurable."

The Scan

Follow-Up Data Requests to Biobank Participants Ineffective, Study Finds

An effort to recontact biobank enrollees for additional information reports low participation in a new BMJ Open study.

Study Finds Widespread Transmission of Resistant Bacteria in Vietnam Hospitals

A sequencing study in The Lancet Microbe finds widespread transmission of drug-resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii in two Vietnam ICUs.

Novel Brain Cell Organoids Show Promise for Autism Research

University of Utah researchers report in Nature Communications on their development of brain cell organoids to study SHANK3-related autism.

Study Finds Few FDA Post-Market Regulatory Actions Backed by Research, Public Assessments

A Yale University-led team examines in The BMJ safety signals from the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System and whether they led to regulatory action.