Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

The Gatekeeper?

Premium

A new study in Cancer Cell suggests the LKB1 gene could help keep melanoma cells from becoming metastatic, reports HealthDay News. When researchers from the University of North Carolina's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center inactivated LKB1 in both human and mouse tumors, non-aggressive melanoma cells became highly metastatic, HealthDay says. Inactivation also played a role in lung metastasis, but not as dramatically as in melanoma, HealthDay adds. "Although we are not totally certain how LKB1 loss promotes metastasis in multiple cancer types, one important effect is the loss of LKB1 starts a chain reaction, activating a family of proteins called SRC kinases, which are known to drive metastasis," said study leader Norman Sharpless in a press release. "Loss of LKB1 occurs in about 30 percent of lung cancer and 10 percent of melanoma. ... These data suggest LKB1-deficient cancers will be more likely to metastasize, and therefore more likely to be incurable."

The Scan

Push Toward Approval

The Wall Street Journal reports the US Food and Drug Administration is under pressure to grant full approval to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.

Deer Exposure

About 40 percent of deer in a handful of US states carry antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, according to Nature News.

Millions But Not Enough

NPR reports the US is set to send 110 million SARS-CoV-2 vaccine doses abroad, but that billions are needed.

PNAS Papers on CRISPR-Edited Cancer Models, Multiple Sclerosis Neuroinflammation, Parasitic Wasps

In PNAS this week: gene-editing approach for developing cancer models, role of extracellular proteins in multiple sclerosis, and more.