Intuitively, pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine make sense. After all, every patient is different, and one person's tumor may not be like the average tumor, or a drug that works well for a particular type of depression might be ineffective for another. "It's very appealing," says Lecia Sequist, a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital. "It makes sense that you don't want to just be treated under an umbrella diagnosis; you really want to have the most specific, personalized treatment that exists."

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Magdalena Skipper, the incoming editor-in-chief of Nature, speaks with NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday.

Genetic genealogy has led to an arrest in another cold case, dating back to 1987.

Wired reports that 23andMe is trying to bolster its outside collaborations.

In PLOS this week: mutation in second gene widens clinical symptoms of people with ADD3 mutations, comparative genomic analysis of Pseudovibrio, and more.